Geisel Software https://geisel.software/rss.xml en IoT Architecture: Build it Right the First Time https://geisel.software/blog/build-it-right-first-time <span>IoT Architecture: Build it Right the First Time</span> <div class="field field--name-field-header-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2019-06/Optimized-image_2019_06_12T17_14_53_468Z.png" width="800" height="535" alt="Build it Right the First Time" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/geisel" lang="" about="/users/geisel" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">geisel</a></span> <span>Wed, 06/12/2019 - 06:47</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item">135</div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>IoT can be an amazing enabler for your product, but it’s important to make sure you get the architecture right. Because IoT solutions involve so many complex, integrated components, a sound IoT architecture is a make-or-break part of product development.  A successful IoT architecture addresses a mix of technical requirements, business implications and delivery considerations. Your IoT architecture should provide a roadmap for reliable, secure data transport, as well as methods to manage and deploy your devices.  </p> <p> </p> <p><b>Begin at The Beginning</b><br /> So, where do you begin? At the beginning, of course! The very first thing you should consider when creating your IoT architecture is the use case of your device. How your product will be used should guide how you define your architecture and whether your networking should be local or cloud-based. Is your application local, where your data can be processed at the edge of your network, close to the source? Maybe you want to walk around a factory floor and check all the smart sensors. You could accomplish this using Bluetooth and a mobile application on a smart phone.</p> <p> </p> <p>But, if you had a light switch that is installed in someone’s home so they can turn lights on and off while they are away, then a local architecture doesn’t make sense. You’d need to design it for the Cloud, where data is gathered and processed in a centralized location, and all devices that need to access this data or use applications associated with it must first connect to the Cloud. The question of whether your device architecture should be local or cloud-based – or a combination of the two – can only be answered by considering its application. You should also take analytics into account when answering that question. If you want to gather analytics from your device without sending out a field engineer, then you need to be thinking about architecting to the Cloud. </p> <p> </p> <p><b>Hardware Matters</b><br /> Evaluating your device hardware and protocol is another important part of planning your IoT architecture. In a typical IT environment, we send as much data as we want with few restrictions. But, the amount of data we can send in an IoT environment is often limited because of battery size, distance, or accessibility. You need to consider several different factors: What is your power source? How much data are you sending? How far are you sending the data? For example, if you are using a sensor to test pH levels in a remote bog, you may only need to send small amounts of data – the pH level results – once a day or once a week.  Because sensors are equipped with very small batteries, you would want to choose a low power networking protocol like MQTT so you reduce your bandwidth and maximize the battery life. Or if you are connecting millions of devices, you may need to reduce bandwidth just because of the sheer volume of data you are collecting. Before choosing your hardware architecture you should analyze the type of sensors/actuators, the communication interface, the amount of data to be captured and the frequency of the data transportation.</p> <p> </p> <p><b>Phone Home</b><br /> Communication between your server and your device is also a vital part of your IoT architecture. Technically, your server does not have the ability to reach out to your IoT device. If you drop a robot in the Pacific Ocean, how does your server know how to communicate with it? Or maybe you have a home intrusion detection system set up behind your firewall? How does your server know how to get through the firewall? Like Steve Speilberg’s infamous E.T., your device must “phone home” to your server to to check for operations and events that need to be carried out on the device. The server can then respond with data back to the device. </p> <p>Part of your architecture should include how often your device will “phone home”. If you are collecting pH levels from a remote bog, it might be fine if your sensor checks in once a day or once a week. But if you are trying to turn on a light in your home, you wouldn’t want to wait a day or an hour for the device to check in with the server to turn on your light. How many devices you have and how often they are “phoning home” all impact the time it takes to push out a message as well as server and resource allocation. The cost of your device-server communication becomes part of your architecture.</p> <p> </p> <p><b>Plays Well With Others</b></p> <p>Your IoT architecture will also be impacted by whether you will be integrating with other devices, components or services.  Do you need to integrate with Google Home, Apple Home Kit, Alexa or some industrial software?  What types of integrations you are supporting will impact whether you need to be in the Cloud. Beyond the question of integration, you need to decide whether you will expose a public API. By making your API public, users can build their own applications to your device. This is where the early adopters live and it represents an opportunity to get feedback on how customers are really interested in using your device and may provide ideas for additional business opportunities.</p> <p> </p> <p><b>Safe And Sound</b><br /> We hear about it every day: security. You must address security when creating your IoT plan. Adding security to your device adds cost. You need to decide if your data needs to be encrypted across the network, at rest, or not at all.  If you are collecting pH levels in a bog, you probably don’t want to chew up battery life encrypting your data. But if you are designing a wearable insulin pump for diabetes, encryption is going to be critical. </p> <p>In addition to security on the device, you also need to think about protecting your data in the Cloud. For instance, many manufacturers put their MySQL database right on the public Internet, collecting data from all their devices which are secured with the same password. If someone cracks the password, they have access to all the data from all your devices. This is a solved problem: simply put your database behind a Web API that will provide user authentication. Many other security issues also have addressed and resolved. Don’t reinvent the wheel – approach these issues with existing systems, methodologies and technologies or find an experienced IoT solutions provider to do it for you.  </p> <p> </p> <p>Planning out your IoT architecture at the beginning of your project is essential for success. Take the time to do it right the first time. Changing an architecture that doesn’t work is like changing the foundation of house; sometimes it can be done, but it’s not easy. Other times you may find that your hardware is all wrong for the features you want to deliver, and you must start all over again. It’s important to design a scalable, flexible architecture that meets not only today’s requirements, but will allow you to add features in the future without starting again from ground zero. </p> </div> <div id="field-language-display"><div class="form-item js-form-item form-type-item js-form-type-item form-item- js-form-item- form-group"> <label class="control-label">Language</label> English </div> </div> Wed, 12 Jun 2019 05:47:38 +0000 geisel 227 at https://geisel.software CEO Brian Geisel to Discuss a Safer IoT at LiveWorx ‘19 https://geisel.software/content/ceo-brian-geisel-discuss-safer-iot-liveworx-19 <span>CEO Brian Geisel to Discuss a Safer IoT at LiveWorx ‘19</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/102429" lang="" about="/user/102429" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">shikha</a></span> <span>Fri, 05/17/2019 - 06:19</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Geisel Software CEO Brian Geisel will present at LiveWorx ’19, the definitive event for digital transformation. In his session “End-To-End IoT Security: A Safer Internet of Things”, Geisel will discuss common security pitfalls in the Internet of Things and how to protect your entire IoT environment from end-to-end. This practical roadmap to IoT security will address all the vulnerable points in an IoT environment, including:</p> <p>* Security Myths: Understanding the Risks</p> <p>* How to protect your IoT network against infiltration</p> <p>* Defending your web services in the cloud</p> <p><a name="_GoBack" id="_GoBack"></a> * Architecting “Security from the start”</p> <p>* Keeping the fleet safe, now and forever</p> <p><br />  </p> <p><u>About LiveWorx ‘19</u></p> <p>LiveWorx® 19 digital transformation conference is hosted by PTC in the heart of Boston from June 10-13, 2019. More than 7,000 technologists, leaders, experts, industry evangelists, and influencers from over 70 countries are expected to attend the premier digital transformation conference. The award-winning LiveWorx event provides a dynamic framework to meet, share, explore, and learn about how cutting-edge technologies are transforming the physical and digital worlds.</p> </div> <section> </section> Fri, 17 May 2019 05:19:03 +0000 shikha 226 at https://geisel.software https://geisel.software/content/ceo-brian-geisel-discuss-safer-iot-liveworx-19#comments sub page https://geisel.software/content/sub-page <span>sub page</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/102429" lang="" about="/user/102429" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">shikha</a></span> <span>Tue, 01/08/2019 - 12:16</span> Tue, 08 Jan 2019 12:16:16 +0000 shikha 218 at https://geisel.software Html mail page https://geisel.software/content/html-mail-page <span>Html mail page</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/user/102429" lang="" about="/user/102429" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">shikha</a></span> <span>Tue, 01/08/2019 - 06:13</span> Tue, 08 Jan 2019 06:13:58 +0000 shikha 214 at https://geisel.software Endeavor Robotics https://geisel.software/clients/endeavor-robotics <span>Endeavor Robotics</span> <div class="field field--name-field-client-logo field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2018-09/Endeavor%20Robotics%20Logo_228x129.jpg" width="228" height="129" alt="Endeavor Robotics Logo" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/tgeisel" lang="" about="/users/tgeisel" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">tgeisel</a></span> <span>Mon, 09/17/2018 - 23:37</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p> </p> <p>Endeavor Robotics is the world’s leading provider of battle-tested Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs). We have delivered more than 7,000 robots to customers in over 55 countries. We partner with U.S. and international defense forces, law enforcement, energy and industrial users to design and build innovative robotic solutions that support a wide range of missions.</p> <p>Largest robot supplier to the U.S. Department of Defense; managing multiple Programs-of-Record; Combat-proven products deployed in Afghanistan, Iraq, and other areas of conflict.</p> <p>Developing innovative robotic solutions and customer-driven next generation capabilities; Applying latest in technology, including AI, deep learning, and IOP to new mission needs; Partnering with leading tech firms for advanced radio, sensor and payload integration.</p> <p>Design, Manufacturing and Integration Experts; Robots built under ISO 9001 processes; American design/manufacturing; American-owned.<br />  </p> </div> <section> </section> Mon, 17 Sep 2018 22:37:07 +0000 tgeisel 211 at https://geisel.software https://geisel.software/clients/endeavor-robotics#comments U.S. Dept of Veterans Affairs https://geisel.software/clients/us-dept-veterans-affairs <span>U.S. Dept of Veterans Affairs</span> <div class="field field--name-field-client-logo field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2018-09/Veteran%20Affairs%20Logo%20210x129.jpg" width="210" height="129" alt="Veterans Affairs Logo" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/tgeisel" lang="" about="/users/tgeisel" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">tgeisel</a></span> <span>Mon, 09/17/2018 - 23:21</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p> </p> <p>The US Department of Veterans Affairs provides patient care and federal benefits to veterans and their dependents.</p> <p><strong>Mission Statement</strong><br /> To fulfill President Lincoln's promise "To care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan" by serving and honoring the men and women who are America's veterans.</p> <p><strong>VA Core Values and Characteristics</strong><br /> Core values describe an organization's culture and character and serve as the foundation for the way individuals in an organization interact with each other and with people outside of the organization. The Department of Veterans Affairs Core Values and Characteristics apply across the entire VA enterprise.</p> </div> <section> </section> Mon, 17 Sep 2018 22:21:35 +0000 tgeisel 210 at https://geisel.software https://geisel.software/clients/us-dept-veterans-affairs#comments Medica Corporation https://geisel.software/clients/medica-corporation <span>Medica Corporation</span> <div class="field field--name-field-client-logo field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2018-09/Medica_Corp_Logo_204x129.jpg" width="204" height="129" alt="Medica Corporation Logo" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/tgeisel" lang="" about="/users/tgeisel" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">tgeisel</a></span> <span>Mon, 09/17/2018 - 22:39</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Medica Corporation manufactures simple-to-use, highly reliable diagnostic blood testing analyzers. Actively engaged in developing new technology, Medica specifically designs products to enhance productivity and the quality of care in small to medium-size in vitro diagnostic laboratories. Medica’s clinical chemistry, blood gas, electrolyte, and hematology analyzers are focused on the global need to lower health care costs.</p> </div> <section> </section> Mon, 17 Sep 2018 21:39:50 +0000 tgeisel 209 at https://geisel.software https://geisel.software/clients/medica-corporation#comments Congruity 360 https://geisel.software/clients/congruity-360 <span>Congruity 360</span> <div class="field field--name-field-client-logo field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2018-09/Congruity%20360%20Logo_LARGER_280X147.jpg" width="280" height="147" alt="Congruity 360 Logo" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/tgeisel" lang="" about="/users/tgeisel" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">tgeisel</a></span> <span>Mon, 09/17/2018 - 22:17</span> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Congruity360 is a comprehensive solution provider for complete data lifecycle management.</p> <p>As a single-source managed solutions provider, we offer a comprehensive portfolio of services to enable lifecycle management of enterprise IT infrastructures. Our operation only succeeds when we provide guidance and solutions derived solely from practical experience and we recognize that our team’s hands-on experience and training is our most valuable asset.</p> <p>We also recognize that data security is vital to the operational success of an organization, and this is where we come in to help! We understand the challenges that IT professionals face as businesses scale, like the needs for increased and fast-paced data growth, decreased time to market, and expanded infrastructure and storage capacity.</p> </div> <section> </section> Mon, 17 Sep 2018 21:17:53 +0000 tgeisel 208 at https://geisel.software https://geisel.software/clients/congruity-360#comments Why IoT Security Must Be Built-in From the Start https://geisel.software/blog/why-iot-security-must-be-built-start <span>Why IoT Security Must Be Built-in From the Start</span> <div class="field field--name-field-header-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2018-03/bigstock%20Colorful%20Painted%20Door%20Padlock-800x431-108956531.jpg" width="800" height="431" alt="Colorfully painted wooden door with padlock" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/geisel" lang="" about="/users/geisel" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">geisel</a></span> <span>Mon, 03/19/2018 - 21:19</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item">128</div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p dir="ltr">Developments within the Internet of Things (IoT) space are happening at tremendous speed, but the pace of this change creates challenges from a security standpoint.</p> <p>Recent research from Capgemini Consulting found most organizations are not providing adequate security and privacy safeguards within their IoT products.</p> <p>Much of this is a result of a lack of specialized security skills, but also glaring inefficiencies within the IoT product development process. Capgemini’s survey found only 48 percent of companies focus on securing their IoT products from the very beginning of product development.</p> <p>This is potentially disastrous. Given the expanding potential attack base being created by the huge growth in connected devices, security needs to be just as much at the heart of any IoT development as the product’s basic functionalities.</p> <p>Stopping hackers, and preventing holes from being left in any IoT system, is something that must be thought out from the very beginning. This goes beyond even the system itself, and how it connects devices together and to the cloud. Developers need to think even further ahead. For example, they need to plan how they are going to carry out necessary firmware upgrades down the line in a secure manner.</p> <p>Ensuring security is woven into the product development should not be too difficult. Security is a customer’s major concern when it comes to IoT, and ensuring they are adequately protected can be key to future sales and revenues. The security solutions are out there, manufacturers just have to make sure they use them.</p> <p>This is slightly complicated by the fact that, because the industry is still in its early stages, people are still figuring security out. There are so many companies coming up with IoT solutions, that we are yet to have any one-stop security solutions because of the diversity of devices.</p> <p>This means that what secures one device will not necessarily be sufficient for the next device because it might be completely different. Plus, each device has so many different aspects to it - say Bluetooth, or Wi-Fi, or radio - that they cannot all fold into a solution.</p> <p>Nonetheless, the solutions are out there, and they must be built into IoT products at the earliest stage. Nordic, for example, has software on its devices that conducts encrypted firmware uploads. Those are starting to emerge for a variety of aspects of IoT devices. So when commencing your top-level design, you need to look at the particular things that should be secured on each device, and make sure they are tackled from the start.</p> <p>This will obviously depend on what components are involved in each case, on a client-by-client basis. There is no one solution to IoT security, it is different to every device. But ensuring you have in-built the security solutions from the very beginning will ensure it is not an ongoing burden for your company, and will save time and aggravation in the long run.</p> <p>Don’t get caught unaware. When you start mapping out your product functionality, map out how you propose to deal with security every step of the way, identifying the solutions that work for each particular issue. Your client, and your business, will thank you in the long term.</p> </div> <div id="field-language-display"><div class="form-item js-form-item form-type-item js-form-type-item form-item- js-form-item- form-group"> <label class="control-label">Language</label> English </div> </div> Mon, 19 Mar 2018 21:19:26 +0000 geisel 204 at https://geisel.software Consumers Need to Get Wise to IoT Security https://geisel.software/blog/consumers-need-get-wise-iot-security <span>Consumers Need to Get Wise to IoT Security</span> <div class="field field--name-field-header-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/default/files/2017-10/Bigstock%20-%20Consumer%20Shopping%20-%20800x431.jpg" width="800" height="431" alt="Abstract of consumers in mall area" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="/users/geisel" lang="" about="/users/geisel" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">geisel</a></span> <span>Wed, 10/11/2017 - 18:01</span> <div class="field field--name-field-blog-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--item">128</div> <div class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Too many consumers of Internet of Things solutions do not pay enough attention to security. This level of apathy may have serious repercussions down the line.</p> <p>The research bears this out. An opinion poll by the US Chamber of Commerce’s Technology Engagement Center found that the majority of IoT consumers rely wholly on device manufacturers to detect threats and safeguard them against malicious activity.  </p> <p>In the UK, similar research by tech firm Canonical found almost half of people are not even aware of the dangers surrounding IoT, ignorant of the fact that their devices could be targets for hackers. </p> <p>Almost 40 percent of people say they are not “sufficiently aware” of IoT security dangers, while 79 percent say they have never even read a news article focused on these issues. Of even more concern, the majority of people say their distrust of IoT security has not grown over the last year.</p> <p>This demonstrates that those educational campaigns on the risk of IoT devices are not hitting home. This failure to take security seriously on the part of the consumer could have serious repercussions for the industry as a whole.</p> <p>Firstly, as the Canonical research suggested, the lack of awareness of security issues on the side of consumers means the majority are failing to adequately secure their devices. A shockingly low 31 percent of consumers said they update their devices when updates are released by manufacturers. 40 percent have never, ever, updated their firmware.</p> <p>This obviously comes with huge associated risks. Devices are therefore more susceptible to attack. Such hacks can have dire consequences for users, and could harm the industry in the long-term once people are suddenly made aware in the worst possible way of the potentially catastrophic effects of unsecured connected “things”.</p> <p>The lack of consumer awareness over security places the burden of responsibility on manufacturers. Yet, in many cases, this is not working out for the best. Many companies fail to ensure security is treated as a paramount part of the IoT product development cycle.</p> <p>Other companies fail to ensure they will be able to run future updates on their devices in a secure way. These mechanisms need to be built in from the start, but in a way that they cannot be compromised. Too often this aspect of security is also overlooked.</p> <p>The industry is still in the process of getting security right. The solutions are out there, you just need to know to use them. That is why we need to get consumer education right, to ensure the security and sustained growth of the IoT industry.</p> <p>Aside from ensuring they update their devices, there is not alot consumers can do security-wise. But while they continue to lack understanding of the potentially disastrous repercussions of lax IoT security, manufacturers do not have a financial imperative to build in security solutions.</p> <p>Consumers should ensure they pay attention to things like security reviews for IoT products. This serves a dual purpose. Not only will it ensure their connected devices are secure, but it will place the responsibility back with the manufacturers to ensure they are up to scratch. This way, we can make certain we get security right and allow the industry to fulfill its potential.</p> <p dir="ltr"> </p> </div> <div id="field-language-display"><div class="form-item js-form-item form-type-item js-form-type-item form-item- js-form-item- form-group"> <label class="control-label">Language</label> English </div> </div> Wed, 11 Oct 2017 17:01:11 +0000 geisel 203 at https://geisel.software